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Mineral Process Learnership Opportunities

South32 is offering mineral process learnership opportunities in Hotazel, Northern Cape. The purpose of the role is to provide training and development opportunity to achieve the National Certificate Mineral Process Level 2.

South32 is a resources company built around a single idea: that in a rapidly-changing world, we have an opportunity to make a difference, from the ground up. The roots of South32 are in the Southern Hemisphere, with a head office in Perth and regional hubs in Perth and Johannesburg.

Requirements

  • Serious contenders will have a Grade 12 with Mathematics;
  • Valdi Driver’s License will be advantageous;
  • This training and development opportunity is available to people currently residing in the John Taolo Gaetsewe municipality and proof of residence is required;
  • In making the final decision consideration will be given in achieving the South32 Employment Objectives.

Core Accountabilities 

  • Successfully complete the learnership program;
  • Obtain National Certificate Mineral Process Level 2;
  • Demonstrate commitment to South32 Values and Care Strategy;
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of Mine Safety requirements.

How to apply

Applications close on 04 May 2018. Click here to apply online

Business Development Manager for South Africa / Zambia / Zimbabwe / Uganda / Tanzania / Kenya / Senegal / Ghana / Nigeria

    Engineer with 6-10 years of experience in BD role with Power Utilities clients either through EPC or industrial product sales companies.
    End-to-end responsibility of business development with P&L account.
    Email Address: tuliphr2018@gmail.com

Are You Ready for The Next Job Interview: Test Yourself with These Common Interview Questions and Answers

It is important to prepare yourself for the next interview. Here below are the most common interview questions and suggested answers. What’s so much important is to understand the question before you answer.

1. Can you tell us about yourself?

This question seems simple, so many people fail to prepare for it, but it’s crucial. Here’s the deal: Don’t give your complete employment (or personal) history. Instead give a pitch—one that’s concise and compelling and that shows exactly why you’re the right fit for the job. Start off with the 2-3 specific accomplishments or experiences that you most want the interviewer to know about, then wrap up talking about how that prior experience has positioned you for this specific role.

2. How did you hear about the position?

Another seemingly innocuous question, this is actually a perfect opportunity to stand out and show your passion for and connection to the company. For example, if you found out about the gig through a friend or professional contact, name drop that person, then share why you were so excited about it. If you discovered the company through an event or article, share that. Even if you found the listing through a random job board, share what, specifically, caught your eye about the role.

3. What do you know about the company?

Any candidate can read and regurgitate the company’s “About” page. So, when interviewers ask this, they aren’t necessarily trying to gauge whether you understand the mission—they want to know whether you care about it. Start with one line that shows you understand the company’s goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I’m personally drawn to this mission because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

4. Why do you want this job?

Again, companies want to hire people who are passionate about the job, so you should have a great answer about why you want the position. (And if you don’t? You probably should apply elsewhere.) First, identify a couple of key factors that make the role a great fit for you (e.g., “I love customer support because I love the constant human interaction and the satisfaction that comes from helping someone solve a problem”), then share why you love the company (e.g., “I’ve always been passionate about education, and I think you guys are doing great things, so I want to be a part of it”).

5. Why should we hire you?

This question seems forward (not to mention intimidating!), but if you’re asked it, you’re in luck: There’s no better setup for you to sell yourself and your skills to the hiring manager. Your job here is to craft an answer that covers three things: that you can not only do the work, you can deliver great results; that you’ll really fit in with the team and culture; and that you’d be a better hire than any of the other candidates.

6. What are your greatest professional strengths?

When answering this question, interview coach Pamela Skillings recommends being accurate (share your true strengths, not those you think the interviewer wants to hear); relevant (choose your strengths that are most targeted to this particular position); and specific (for example, instead of “people skills,” choose “persuasive communication” or “relationship building”). Then, follow up with an example of how you’ve demonstrated these traits in a professional setting.

7. What do you consider to be your weaknesses?

What your interviewer is really trying to do with this question—beyond identifying any major red flags—is to gauge your self-awareness and honesty. So, “I can’t meet a deadline to save my life” is not an option—but neither is “Nothing! I’m perfect!” Strike a balance by thinking of something that you struggle with but that you’re working to improve. For example, maybe you’ve never been strong at public speaking, but you’ve recently volunteered to run meetings to help you be more comfortable when addressing a crowd.

8. What is your greatest professional achievement?

Nothing says “hire me” better than a track record of achieving amazing results in past jobs, so don’t be shy when answering this question! A great way to do so is by using the S-T-A-R method: Set up the situation and the task that you were required to complete to provide the interviewer with background context (e.g., “In my last job as a junior analyst, it was my role to manage the invoicing process”), but spend the bulk of your time describing what you actually did (the action) and what you achieved (the result). For example, “In one month, I streamlined the process, which saved my group 10 man-hours each month and reduced errors on invoices by 25%.”

9. Tell me about a challenge or conflict you’ve faced at work, and how you dealt with it.

In asking this question, “your interviewer wants to get a sense of how you will respond to conflict. Anyone can seem nice and pleasant in a job interview, but what will happen if you’re hired and Gladys in Compliance starts getting in your face?” says Skillings. Again, you’ll want to use the S-T-A-R method, being sure to focus on how you handled the situation professionally and productively, and ideally closing with a happy ending, like how you came to a resolution or compromise.

10. Where do you see yourself in five years?

If asked this question, be honest and specific about your future goals, but consider this: A hiring manager wants to know a) if you’ve set realistic expectations for your career, b) if you have ambition (a.k.a., this interview isn’t the first time you’re considering the question), and c) if the position aligns with your goals and growth. Your best bet is to think realistically about where this position could take you and answer along those lines. And if the position isn’t necessarily a one-way ticket to your aspirations? It’s OK to say that you’re not quite sure what the future holds, but that you see this experience playing an important role in helping you make that decision.

11. What’s your dream job?

Along similar lines, the interviewer wants to uncover whether this position is really in line with your ultimate career goals. While “an NBA star” might get you a few laughs, a better bet is to talk about your goals and ambitions—and why this job will get you closer to them.

12. What other companies are you interviewing with?

Companies ask this for a number of reasons, from wanting to see what the competition is for you to sniffing out whether you’re serious about the industry. “Often the best approach is to mention that you are exploring a number of other similar options in the company’s industry,” says job search expert Alison Doyle. “It can be helpful to mention that a common characteristic of all the jobs you are applying to is the opportunity to apply some critical abilities and skills that you possess. For example, you might say ‘I am applying for several positions with IT consulting firms where I can analyze client needs and translate them to development teams in order to find solutions to technology problems.’”

13. Why are you leaving your current job?

This is a toughie, but one you can be sure you’ll be asked. Definitely keep things positive—you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Instead, frame things in a way that shows that you’re eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you’re interviewing for is a better fit for you than your current or last position. For example, “I’d really love to be part of product development from beginning to end, and I know I’d have that opportunity here.” And if you were let go? Keep it simple: “Unfortunately, I was let go,” is a totally OK answer.

14. Why were you fired?

OK, if you get the admittedly much tougher follow-up question as to why you were let go (and the truth isn’t exactly pretty), your best bet is to be honest (the job-seeking world is small, after all). But it doesn’t have to be a deal-breaker. Share how you’ve grown and how you approach your job and life now as a result. If you can position the learning experience as an advantage for this next job, even better.

15. What are you looking for in a new position?

Hint: Ideally the same things that this position has to offer. Be specific.

16. What type of work environment do you prefer?

Hint: Ideally one that’s similar to the environment of the company you’re applying to. Be specific.

17. What’s your management style?

The best managers are strong but flexible, and that’s exactly what you want to show off in your answer. (Think something like, “While every situation and every team member requires a bit of a different strategy, I tend to approach my employee relationships as a coach…”) Then, share a couple of your best managerial moments, like when you grew your team from five to 15 or coached an underperforming employee to become the company’s top salesperson.

18. What’s a time you exercised leadership?

Depending on what’s more important for the the role, you’ll want to choose an example that showcases your project management skills (spearheading a project from end to end, juggling multiple moving parts) or one that shows your ability to confidently and effectively rally a team. And remember: “The best stories include enough detail to be believable and memorable,” says Skillings. “Show how you were a leader in this situation and how it represents your overall leadership experience and potential.”

19. What’s a time you disagreed with a decision that was made at work?

Everyone disagrees with the boss from time to time, but in asking this question, hiring managers want to know that you can do so in a productive, professional way. “You don’t want to tell the story about the time when you disagreed but your boss was being a jerk and you just gave in to keep the peace. And you don’t want to tell the one where you realized you were wrong,” says Peggy McKee of Career Confidential. “Tell the one where your actions made a positive difference on the outcome of the situation, whether it was a work-related outcome or a more effective and productive working relationship.”

20. How would your boss and co-workers describe you?

First of all, be honest (remember, if you get this job, the hiring manager will be calling your former bosses and co-workers!). Then, try to pull out strengths and traits you haven’t discussed in other aspects of the interview, such as your strong work ethic or your willingness to pitch in on other projects when needed.

21. Why was there a gap in your employment?

If you were unemployed for a period of time, be direct and to the point about what you’ve been up to (and hopefully, that’s a litany of impressive volunteer and other mind-enriching activities, like blogging or taking classes). Then, steer the conversation toward how you will do the job and contribute to the organization: “I decided to take a break at the time, but today I’m ready to contribute to this organization in the following ways.”

22. Can you explain why you changed career paths?

Don’t be thrown off by this question—just take a deep breath and explain to the hiring manager why you’ve made the career deicions you have. More importantly, give a few examples of how your past experience is transferrable to the new role. This doesn’t have to be a direct connection; in fact, it’s often more impressive when a candidate can make seemingly irrelevant experience seem very relevant to the role.

23. How do you deal with pressure or stressful situations?

“Choose an answer that shows that you can meet a stressful situation head-on in a productive, positive manner and let nothing stop you from accomplishing your goals,” says McKee. A great approach is to talk through your go-to stress-reduction tactics (making the world’s greatest to-do list, stopping to take 10 deep breaths), and then share an example of a stressful situation you navigated with ease.

24. What would your first 30, 60, or 90 days look like in this role?

Start by explaining what you’d need to do to get ramped up. What information would you need? What parts of the company would you need to familiarize yourself with? What other employees would you want to sit down with? Next, choose a couple of areas where you think you can make meaningful contributions right away. (e.g., “I think a great starter project would be diving into your email marketing campaigns and setting up a tracking system for them.”) Sure, if you get the job, you (or your new employer) might decide there’s a better starting place, but having an answer prepared will show the interviewer where you can add immediate impact—and that you’re excited to get started.

25. What are your salary requirements?

The #1 rule of answering this question is doing your research on what you should be paid by using sites like Payscale and Glassdoor. You’ll likely come up with a range, and we recommend stating the highest number in that range that applies, based on your experience, education, and skills. Then, make sure the hiring manager knows that you’re flexible. You’re communicating that you know your skills are valuable, but that you want the job and are willing to negotiate.

26. What do you like to do outside of work?

Interviewers ask personal questions in an interview to “see if candidates will fit in with the culture [and] give them the opportunity to open up and display their personality, too,” says longtime hiring manager Mitch Fortner. “In other words, if someone asks about your hobbies outside of work, it’s totally OK to open up and share what really makes you tick. (Do keep it semi-professional, though: Saying you like to have a few beers at the local hot spot on Saturday night is fine. Telling them that Monday is usually a rough day for you because you’re always hungover is not.)”

27. If you were an animal, which one would you want to be?

Seemingly random personality-test type questions like these come up in interviews generally because hiring managers want to see how you can think on your feet. There’s no wrong answer here, but you’ll immediately gain bonus points if your answer helps you share your strengths or personality or connect with the hiring manager. Pro tip: Come up with a stalling tactic to buy yourself some thinking time, such as saying, “Now, that is a great question. I think I would have to say… ”

28. How many tennis balls can you fit into a limousine?

1,000? 10,000? 100,000? Seriously?

Well, seriously, you might get asked brainteaser questions like these, especially in quantitative jobs. But remember that the interviewer doesn’t necessarily want an exact number—he wants to make sure that you understand what’s being asked of you, and that you can set into motion a systematic and logical way to respond. So, just take a deep breath, and start thinking through the math. (Yes, it’s OK to ask for a pen and paper!)

29. Are you planning on having children?

Questions about your family status, gender (“How would you handle managing a team of all men?”), nationality (“Where were you born?”), religion, or age, are illegal—but they still get asked (and frequently). Of course, not always with ill intent—the interviewer might just be trying to make conversation—but you should definitely tie any questions about your personal life (or anything else you think might be inappropriate) back to the job at hand. For this question, think: “You know, I’m not quite there yet. But I am very interested in the career paths at your company. Can you tell me more about that?”

30. What do you think we could do better or differently?

This is a common one at startups (and one of our personal favorites here at The Muse). Hiring managers want to know that you not only have some background on the company, but that you’re able to think critically about it and come to the table with new ideas. So, come with new ideas! What new features would you love to see? How could the company increase conversions? How could customer service be improved? You don’t need to have the company’s four-year strategy figured out, but do share your thoughts, and more importantly, show how your interests and expertise would lend themselves to the job.

31. Do you have any questions for us?

You probably already know that an interview isn’t just a chance for a hiring manager to grill you—it’s your opportunity to sniff out whether a job is the right fit for you. What do you want to know about the position? The company? The department? The team?

You’ll cover a lot of this in the actual interview, so have a few less-common questions ready to go. We especially like questions targeted to the interviewer (“What’s your favorite part about working here?”) or the company’s growth (“What can you tell me about your new products or plans for growth?”)

HWSETA Wants to Employ Graduates in Various Fields

Closing Date: 31 January 2018

The Health and Welfare Sector Education and TRaining Authority is offering internship opportunities in the fields listed below:

Human Resources

  • Intern: Human Resource: To gain training and workplace experience in the provisioning of HR transactional/functional support; HR Administration & Information management.

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Human Resource Management  hr@hwseta.org.za

Skills Development Planning (SDP)

  • Intern: Skills Development Planning : To gain training and workplace experience in the Skills Development planning, tracking; documentation management; Planning, preparing, implementing learning programmes and coordinating thereof by delegation of the SDP

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Business Administration, Education, Training and Development, Human Resources Development, Social Sciences or an equivalent qualification [2x] hr@hwseta.org.za

Office of the CEO

  • Intern: Office of the CEO: To gain training and workplace experience in the legal support, advice and consultation to HWSETA, board, stand ing committees and stakeholders and provide strategic management administration to the office of the CEO for effective and efficient coordination of the organisation and the CEO Office. Enhances executive’s effectiveness by providing information management support Bachelor’s

Degree or equivalent, LLB . National Diploma or

Degree or N6 in Business Administration or Secretarial qualification. [2x] hr2@hwseta.org.za

Information Technology (IT)

  • Intern: Information Technology : To gain training and workplace experience in the maintenance and performance of the organizational IT infrastructure performing technical work installing, operating and providing second level support for the local and wide area networks, personal computer s and the PBX . Provides operational and technical support of User – , Application and Server requirements and sustainment of efficient performance of and preventative maintenance of hardware and software National Diploma or

Degree or N6 in Computer and Information Sciences, General; Computer Science; Information Science/Studies; Management Information Systems, General  hr@hwseta.org.za

Finance

  • Intern: Finance: To gain training and workplace experience in the Cash Book function, Petty Cash and in Debtors and Creditors functions. Banking and reconciliation of deposits.

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Finance  hr@hwseta.org.za

Supply Chain Management

  • Intern: Supply Chain Management : To gain training and workplace experience in the administrative support in the procurement of goods, management of the tender processes, management of requisition, ordering, distribution and adminis tration of stationery.

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Supply Chain Management  hr@hwseta.org.za

Marketing  

  • Intern: Marketing: To gain training and workplace experience in event management, implement branding initiatives, maintain an up – to – date media contact database, reporting, development of communications strategy and programme, producing marketing plans, advertising activities, manage stakeholder relationships.

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Marketing  hr@hwseta.org.za

Research, Information, Monitoring and Evaluation (RIME)

  • Intern: Research, Information, Monitoring and Evaluation : To gain training and workplace experience in working with Researchers in development of data collection instructions, Capturing and analysis of data, Report writing, Presentation of findings, Administrative functions relating to research, Understanding of Research methods and process.

Bachelor’s degree in Social Science, Education – with a distinct interest in the wonders of the Research environment (NQF level 7) [2x] hr2@hwseta.org.za

Education Training Quality Assurance (ETQA)

  • Intern: ETQA: To gain training and workplace experience in ensuring that education and training systems, processes, procedures and qualifications are in place to ensure that high-quality education and training is available in the education sector as per the relevant pieces of legislation. Bachelor’s

Degree or National Diploma or N6 in Education, Training and Development, Human Resources Development, Social Sciences or an equivalent qualification [2x] hr2@hwseta.org.za

Provincial Offices – (Gauteng, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, North West, KwaZulu Natal, Free State, Northern Cape, Western Cape and Eastern Cape) [x9]

  • TVET Learners : Administrator learner : Assist with administrative duties in the provincial offices, filing, record keeping, switchboard and general administrative duties. Providing administrative assistance to the ETQA division, including overall planning, tracking and documentation management.

N 6 in Business Admin/Public Admin or Office Administration hr2@hwseta.org.za

Requirements

  • The prospective candidate should have NO working experience in the field of study and prior internship experience.
  • The successful candidate will receive a stipend.
  • Candidates whose appointment will promote representivity in terms of race, disability and gender will receive preference.
  • HWSETA will verify credit and criminal record as well as qualifications.
  • The HWSETA reserves the right not to make an appointment to the advertised post and will only communicate with short – listed candidates

SA Air Force Traineeship Programme 2018 to 2019

SA Air Force Traineeship Programme

  • South African citizen
  • Age between 18 and 22 (Graduate applicants the maximum age of 22 – 25 years in possession of N4 – N6 — Technical)
  • Passed Mathematics and Physical Science Level 3
  • Comply with medical fitness requirements for pilot training in the SA Air ForceDownload Application Form for SA Air Force Traineeship Programme

Enquiries: 012 312 2875 / 2319 / 2148 / 1261 / 2752 / 2665 / 2462

SA Army Intelligence Traineeship ProgrammeThe MSD programme is a two-year voluntary service system with the long-term goal of enhancing the SA National Defence Force’s deployment capability. Recruits are required to sign up for a period of two years, during which they will receive Basic and Functional Military Training in their first year of service. Recruits wishing to join the Special Forces can complete any of the other Services’ MSD programmes during the first year. During the second year of service potential candidates will attend the Special Forces Basic Training Cycle.

  • South African citizen
  • Age between 18 and 22 (graduates 26)
  • Currently in Grade 12 or completed
  • Not area bound
  • No record of serious criminal offence or offences
  • Preferably single
  • Comply with medical fitness requirements for appointment in the SANDF

Download Application Form for SA Army Intelligence Traineeship Programme

Should you not hear from the Department of Defence by 31 October 2018 please assume that you application has been unsuccessful. The Department of Defence reserves the right to employment.

SA Army Youth Traineeship Programme 2018 to 2019

Dept of Defence: Youth Traineeship Programme

Location: ♦ Gauteng ♦ Eastern Cape ♦ Free State ♦ Northern Cape ♦ Limpopo ♦ Mpumalanga ♦ Western Cape ♦ North West ♦ KZN

Dept of Defence: Youth Traineeship ProgrammeThe one year academic programme will commence in January at a training facility in Gauteng (Ekhurhuleni College). Accommodation, meals, study aids, stationary and pocket money will be provided to the learners.

  • Must at least be 18 years of age but not older than 22 and must have completed Grade 12
  • up to 26 years of age and must be completed grade 12 with a 3 years tertiary qualification
  • Leadership Potential
  • Not area bound
  • No criminal Record

Download the South African Military Skills Development Application Form 2019

If you are interested in the Military Skills Development System in the SA Army, please complete the coupon with the requested documentation enclosed and post it to:

SA Army HQ,

Dir Army HR,

SA Army Recruiting Centre,

Private Bag X 981,

Pretoria, 0001.

Specific related enquiries can be directed to (012) 355 1420 or (012) 355 1438. Further information can be obtained on www.dod.mil.zawww.army.mil.za

Closing Date: 28 February 2018

Sales Associate Learnership- Johannesburg

Position Description: The Foschini Group (TFG) is offering a number of sales associate learnerships in stores. Sales associate learnerships are designed to give trainees exposure to the on-the-go world of retail and fast fashion. It’s an opportunity to explore the inner workings of retail, through completing individual and group projects. We are offering a 12 month learnership for matriculants…

Public Works Learnerships 60 Positions

The Mpumalanga Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport has 60 opportunities for a Learnership Programme as follows:

  • x15 Bohlabela in Plumbing (NQF level 4);
  • x15 Gert Sibande in Plumbing (NQF level 4);
  • x15 Nkangala in Electrical Engineering (NQF level 3) and
  • x15 Ehlanzeni in Carpentry (NQF level 4)

for the 2018/19 Financial Year. Interested unemployed persons are invited to apply for the above mentioned opportunities.

  • The applicants must be between 18 and 35 years old, unemployed and must not have entered into a Learnership before.
  • In possession of grade 12 (National Senior Certificate).
  • Must be fit to operate heavy construction equipment.
  • All signed and dated applications should be submitted on form Z83 (download here)obtained at any government department.
  • Applications must be accompanied by a brief CV, certified copies of qualification(s) and ID.

Participants will undergo both interview and placement test. Successful candidates will be informed accordingly.

Participants will undergo both theory and practical training for a period of twelve months upon signing of a 12 month contract which is not renewable.

The Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. Women and persons with disabilities are also encouraged to apply.

How to apply

Closing date is 09 February 2018 at 16H00

Applications must be forwarded to:

Head: Public Works, Roads & Transport
Private Bag x 11302
Mbombela
1200

Applications addressed as above can also be hand–delivered at: Head Office (Mbombela, Riverside Government Complex, Building no. 9, Main Entrance Gate)

Enquiries

Bohlabela District Office (Thulamahashe): Mr W Molomudi 013 773 0334
Ehlanzeni District Office (Mbombela): Mr G Mashile 013 762 6067
Nkangala District Office (KwaMhlanga): Ms G Mabena 013 947 2593
Gert Sibande District Office (Ermelo): Mr H Mkhonza 017 801 4000 / 5600

No faxed or e-mailed application will be considered.

Head Office Enquiries: Mr Mbuyane (013) 766 6841 and Mr Malumene (013) 766 6468.

Note: Communication will be restricted to the shortlisted candidates only. Should you not hear from the Department within three months from the closing date of this advertisement, consider your application unsuccessful.